New Products for Mobile Workers -- December 2007

— December 01, 2007

Power in the Field
A year after its debut, the SwitchBack rugged ultra mobile personal computer (UMPC) adds enhanced features and capabilities. The military-grade device is powered by a 1.0 GHz Intel Celeron M processor and runs on Windows XP or Vista operating systems. Users navigate via condensed keyboard or on the 5.6 inch WSVGA touchscreen with stylus, viewable even in bright sunlight. Bluetooth and WiFi capabilities are built in, and GPS can be included for an additional fee. This UMPC features patent-pending Status & Control, a feature that enables remote diagnostics for quicker troubleshooting. It also monitors functions such as the computer's temperature levels, power consumption and input/output shortages. Price: $5,995. www.ropermobile.com
 
Keep Out!
Bluefire's Mobile Defender VPN brings laptop-level security to cell phones, which could be beneficial for independent mobile professionals. Mobile Defender is compatible with Windows Mobile 2003 and 5.0 and Palm operating systems. Of the three, the Palm version is the only one that's not FIPS 140-2 compliant. Setting up the VPN promises to be simple and straightforward-Mobile Defender is designed to work with certificates and smart card authentication and can be easily integrated into existing I.T. infrastructures. Price: Unavailable. www.bluefiresecurity.com
 
Work Big
InFocus unveils its Work Big IN15 ultra-slim notebook projector designed for the mobile professional. Brighter than its predecessor-with 25 percent more lumens, the Work Big IN15 features a slim, 1.7 inch form factor and filter-free design. Users can manipulate presentations with the accompanying wireless infrared remote and take advantage of the IN15's 1.4:1 to 2.0:1 zoom ratio. The VGA port allows seamless transition between data and video sources. Price: $1,499. www.infocus.com
 
Mobile Messenger
i-mate's Ultimate 9502 Windows Mobile 6 messaging device is loaded with features, such as triband 3.5G 8.02.11b/g WiFi, Bluetooth, and quad-band GSM with EDGE wireless connectivity. Its GPS capabilities provide maps, directions, and other locationbased services. A slide-out QWERTY keyboard simplifies email and messaging, and a 3.0 megapixel camera enables video phone calls. Users can manipulate the crisp graphics on the 2.8-inch touchscreen for quick navigation. Price: $785. www.imate.com
 
SPOT to the Rescue
The SPOT satellite messenger works by coordinating the user's exact location over the GPS satellite network and transmitting that information to emergency personnel, family and friends. It can be used as a backup communication tool in the event of a natural disaster that cripples cellular networks. SPOT is particularly useful for road warriors-such as insurance agents and sales executives-who run the risk of being stranded in remote locations as they drive from appointment to appointment. Price: $169.99 for the device; $99.99 for annual service. www.findmespot.com
 
Total Tablet
DT Research brings to the market the first industrial mobile Tablet PC featuring an integrated barcode scanner, magnetic swipe reader and camera. Available in 8.4- and 10.4-inch form factors, the industrial mobile Tablet PCs weigh less than 2 pounds. The internal battery is hot swappable, and users can add on an external battery for extended usage while charging the drained battery in a wearable pouch. The Tablet, which runs on Windows XP and CE and Linux operating systems, delivers a mobile point-of-service solution that integrates commercial software with automatic information and data capture applications. It's sturdy enough to survive a 4-foot drop and useful for many markets, including healthcare, hospitality and law enforcement. Price: Starts at $1,499 for the 8.4 inch version, and $1,699 for the 10.4 inch. www.dtresearch.com
 

POST A COMMENT

comments powered by Disqus

RATE THIS CONTENT (5 Being the Best)

12345
Current rating: 0 (0 ratings)

MOST READ STORIES

topics

Must See


FEATURED REPORT

Who Owns Mobility

Less than one decade ago, smartphones and tablets changed workplace technology—virtually overnight. IT lost "control" and users became decision makers. Is it any wonder we are still trying to figure things out, and that the question of  "who owns mobility" remains? This research examines the current state of mobility in an attempt to answer that question.