Show & Tell: The Gadgets I Can't Live Without - January 2010

— January 05, 2010

Jonathan Farley
Manager Telecommunications, CKE Restaurants
Jonathan Farley handles the telecommunications needs of CKE Restaurants. Through a network of subsidiaries, franchisees and licensees, the quick-service restaurant chain has more than 3,000 outlets in 43 U.S. states and 13 countries. CKE brands include Carl's Jr., Hardees, Green Burrito and Red Burrito. Jonathan is focused on deploying the latest telecommunications technology to improve business processes throughout the organization.

 
OLDEST GADGET
Antique telephone.
The day of the wired telephone may be waning, but  of all the electronic devices today, my passion is antique bell telephones. Solid and built to last!

 
ON MY DESK
Logitech Speakers for iPod.
It's a simple gadget packed with high performance speakers in a small, compact design. Includes travel case with separate compartment for cables and AC adapter.

 
 
STRICTLY BUSINESS
Polycom Communicator C100
It's great for softphone use, without the foot print of the large IP deskphones. The C100 has remarkable audio quality for a small product.

 
 
STRICTLY PERSONAL
Classic iPod.
I never leave home without it! At 30 GB, it is fully packed with almost 6,000 songs; no videos or pictures, just music! One of these days, I need to step up to a 160 GB, but that still won't be enough storage for my music.

 
 
INDISPENSIBLE TRAVEL TOOL
Palm Pre...
...with Sprint Navigation by TeleNav. Combining my personal and business profiles, with contacts, calendar, email, etc. and the satisfaction of knowing I will not get lost on my way to the 2010 Mobile Enterprise Executive Summit on Nov. 3-5!

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