Cheers to Mobility

— June 01, 2006

There's little doubt that enterprises wishing to be the leaders of their respective industries must streamline operations, reduce or control costs and make the most of their existing workforces. For many, the best way to accomplish these goals is to automate certain processes in the daily flow of their organization.

Whether it be the route sales worker who uses a handheld computer complete with credit card swipe and mobile printer to process transactions immediately upon making deliveries or the traveling executive who snatches email from a smartphone between meetings on the road and is able to respond to time-sensitive requests, the benefits of mobility are clear. Increased data flow, quicker payments, reduced errors and increased productivity are just the tip of the iceberg.

In this month's Field Service cover story, we take a look at a forward-thinking home inspection company based in California. When faced with a rapidly changing business environment, it knew that in order to survive and grow with the market, it needed to adopt mobile technology and make it an essential part of its operations. Read about the challenges it faced and how it succeeded on page 16.

Small enterprises, of course, can benefit just as much as their larger brethren, as evidenced by our Mobile CRM feature about the five most effective mobile professionals. These Lilliputian leaders mobilized their businesses and saw immediate returns from their cutting-edge technology. Read about them on page 22.

This month's Vertical Focus examines how healthcare is using Wi-Fi technology to keep doctors, nurses and patients connected. Find out how on page 30.
Enjoy.

eric m. zeman
Editor-In-Chief
ericz@MobileEnterpriseMag.com

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