AT&T, Box, Rackspace join StackMob's Mobile Marketplace

— February 21, 2013

In comparison to SMBs, which may require deployment of one or three apps at most, larger enterprises may need anywhere between 20 and 100 apps, and quickly. That's where StackMob comes in. The cloud-based mobile app platform provider has joined forces with AT&T, Box, Rackspace and others to offer a marketplace for businesses in need of building and deploying full-featured enterprise mobile apps.

"2013 is going to be an amazing time for the enterprise because everyone is figuring out their mobile strategy," said CEO Ty Amell.

Designed to support larger organizations, the new marketplace offers enterprise-class products and professional services to support mobility and connected services. The launch includes charter collaborators in enterprise software, Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS) and API infrastructure such as Alfresco, AT&T, Box, Braintree, GoodData, Mashery, MuleSoft, New Relic and Rackspace.

Currently, companies use a combination of in-house developers and third-party providers to create proprietary apps. StackMob's single platform is designed to help businesses align its mobile enterprise app strategies with more complex structures and processes within an organization. In addition, experts in scalable, distributed systems also work closely with the IT team throughout the entire lifecycle of mobile enterprise apps.

AT&T is among the first to offer its APIs to developers within the enterprise marketplace. “We’ve opened up our APIs to the developer community, and now we’re looking forward to working with StackMob and their customers to enable richer mobile experiences for enterprise users,” said Carolyn Billings, Associate Vice President of Product Marketing Management at AT&T.

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