BlackBerry 7 OS Awarded Common Criteria EAL4+ Certification

By Tony Rizzo — November 14, 2011

Say what you will about Research in Motion and it's BlackBerry family of products, but one area where RIM absolutely continues to dominate the mobile marketplace is in delivering enormous levels of security to both enterprises and governments across a far-reaching landscape. The latest accreditation is significant, and raises the bar extremely high - no other mobile OS vendor comes close.
 
The BlackBerry 7 Operating System has now been independently evaluated by a third-party Common Criteria evaluation facility and has been judged to meet the security criteria for evaluation assurance level (EAL) 4+. The Common Criteria is an international standard for validating that products meet specific security requirements. EAL4+ accreditation examines a product’s design, software development methodology, and security mechanisms. EAL4+ is the highest level of accreditation under the Common Criteria Recognition Arrangement (CCRA) by 26 countries.
 
RIM is active in the Cryptographic Module Validation Program in North America, United Kingdom CESG Assisted Product Service (CAPS) and International Common Criteria evaluation scheme. BlackBerry Enterprise Server has been previously awarded EAL4+ certification and the BlackBerry Enterprise Solution has also been previously approved for storing and transmitting sensitive data by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as well as government organizations in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Austria, Australia and New Zealand.
 
The consumerization of the enterprise has resulted in an inordinate number of both businesses and governments loosening what was once a rigorous vigilence in all matters of security. Android and iOS, and to a lesser extend Microsoft Windows Mobile and WIndows Phone 7, simply cannot compete with RIM on the security front. 
 
This begs the question - can RIM find a way to reinvigorate its overall enterprise business by doing a much better job of marketing security in the enterprise? Eventually there will be a major security lapse driven by one of the less secure mobile operating systems. When this happens we will likely see a surge in RIM deployments.

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