Good Technology Offers Good for Enterprise Pricing

— August 09, 2013

Good Technology has launched new Good for Enterprise (GFE) pricing.  Businesses of all sizes can securely manage data and devices, and accelerate day one employee productivity with secure email, calendar information, contact details, document data and browser access for $5 per user, per month.

The cross-platform solution works across iOS, Android and Windows Phone devices, enabling organizations to deliver a mobile collaboration business experience with secure containerization to protect sensitive data and corporate IP. 

GFE leverages the same secure mobility architecture offered across the company’s complete product line, including Good Dynamics – a secure mobility platform enabling enterprises to develop their own secure solutions, or procure mobility solutions from the large and growing Good Dynamics Ecosystem. 

“The new Good for Enterprise per user subscription model provides greater commercial flexibility to expand the use of mobile solutions and productivity tools across our business,” said Ricky Higgins, Chief Information Officer, GAM, a provider of independent, active investment management.  “Based on Good’s market-leading security platform, we can now give choice of new mobile devices and applications to wider group of users than before.”

“This will provide me with industry-leading security and the flexibility to drive BYOD deeper into my organization and derive even greater productivity levels than we do today,” said Garry Lengthorn, Director of IT, Sthree, a FTSE listed British-based international staffing business providing permanent and contract specialist recruitment services.

The GFE offers are available now with a special promotion available through December 31, 2013. The per user, per month price is based on annual license.

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