Handheld Releases New Algiz 7

— September 10, 2013

Handheld has launched a new version of its Algiz 7 rugged tablet computer. The updated Algiz 7 is considerably faster than its predecessor, with better storage capacity, improved security and quicker communication capabilities.

Specifically developed for use in tough environments, the rugged tablet is used in mining, geomatics, logistics, forestry, public transportation, construction, utilities, maintenance, military and security.

The ultra-rugged Algiz 7 tablet PC is small, light and fast, with multiple connectivity options and a wide range of functions, designed for field workers demanding a super-durable product that is tough and powerful, yet light and easy to work with.

The tablet meets stringent MIL-STD-810G military standards for withstanding humidity, vibrations, drops and extreme temperatures, and with its IP65 rating it keeps dust and water out as well.

Weighing 1.1 kilograms, the device has a 7-inch widescreen touch display that features the new MaxView technology, providing brightness in outdoor conditions — even direct sunlight. It runs Microsoft Windows 7 and has built-in GPS navigation.

Key Features:

  • N2600 1.6 GHz Dual-Core Intel ATOM processor.
  • More memory, with 4 GB of DDR3 RAM.
  • Better storage, with a 128GB SSD SATA II with recovery partition.
  • Two full mPCIe slots for improved flexibility.
  • Ethernet 10/100/1000 (Gigabit).
  • Added data security with TPM chipset board (chip 1.2).
  • An updated version of the wireless Gobi 3000 technology for higher communications speed.
  • A 5-megapixel camera.
  • Antenna diversity (two antennas) for improved coverage.

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