Is Apple's iPhone 3G Fit For Your Enterprise?

— June 09, 2008

Since the iPhone was launched last year, we've heard I.T. executives bemoan the fact that their CEOs are enamored with a device not meant for the enterprise.

Apple is aiming to change that tune when it makes the iPhone 3G available in the U.S. July 11.

Among the enterprise-friendly features:

  • Out-of-the-box built-in support for Microsoft Exchange Active Sync for push email, contacts and calendar, as well as remote wipe
  • Cisco IPsec VPN for encrypted access to corporate networks.
  • WPA2/802.11x security policies.
  • Support for iWork and Microsoft Office documents
  • Reduced price points: $199 for 8 GB version; $299 for 16 GB version.
  • Universe of third-party apps through the SDK announced earlier this year.
  • New App Store that works over WiFi and cellular networks, enabling the purchase of applications over-the-air.
  • Mass move and delete of email messages.
  • Ability to search for contacts.
  • Internet and email access via quad-band GSM and tri-band HDSPA for voice and data connectivity.
  • Automatic switching among 3G, WiFi and EDGE networks to ensure the fastest possible download speeds.

According to Apple, 35% of Fortune 500 companies participated in a Beta test, including commercial banks, pharmaceutical companies, security firms, airlines and entertainment companies.

In September, a Push Notification System will be available to developers that maintains a consistent IP connection to the phone, enabling third-party applications to push notifications while preserving battery life.

Enterprises will also be able to use the function to authorize and distribute applications on their own Intranet.

Read all about Apple's enterprise pitch and integrating the iPhone 3G into the enterprise.

Check out the product spec sheet, too.

 

 

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