KORE, Huawei Debut M2M Solutions Kit

By Jessica Binns, Contributing Editor — June 07, 2012

M2M specialist KORE says its Quickstart Program for Huawei's Evaluation Kits are now available. Designed specifically for the developer community, the comprehensive KORE Quickstart Program enables companies to more quickly, easily and cost effectively bring new M2M solutions to market on the KORE network.

KORE has teamed with Huawei Device, the leading brand in the field of global mobile broadband and convergence terminals, and Novotech Technologies, a leading provider of M2M solutions designed by the world's top manufacturers, to accelerate the advancement of M2M applications across the globe. The KORE Quickstart Program enables M2M developers to speed development and test cycles, reduce barriers of entry and simplify the pathway to commercial deployment.

Developers using the KORE Quickstart Program can purchase Huawei's M2M modules and evaluation kits through Novotech. By combining the Huawei kits with the Novotech technical support and KORE M2M network services, developers will have all the required components, including cellular connectivity, to quickly bring M2M applications to market.

KORE Quickstart Program participants will also have access to Novotech's proven expertise in key technologies and fulfillment services important to bringing M2M solutions and products to market.

"Partnering with KORE to accelerate the delivery of M2M applications will provide developers with the right hardware, support and cellular network access for bringing M2M applications to market faster with more flexibility," said Richard Hobbs, president at Novotech. "The real-world testing of M2M applications through the KORE Quickstart Program greatly facilitates the path to commercial deployments, saving organizations both time and money."

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