Motion Tablet Gets AuthenTec Fingerprint Security Solution

— May 08, 2008

AuthenTec (NASDAQ: AUTH), the world's leading provider of fingerprint sensors and solutions, announced that its fingerprint sensor has been integrated as a standard feature into the new Motion Computing(R) F5 tablet PC. The F5 tablet, which combines the best features of a rugged PC with the portable convenience of a tablet PC, integrates an AuthenTec fingerprint sensor to protect the device, its stored data, and the networks to which it connects.

The F5 addresses issues encountered by mobile workforces across industries like field service, manufacturing, government and construction. Organizations within these industries are seeking to reduce the number of devices technicians carry, improve workflow, reduce data collection errors and ensure users can communicate with host systems and each other, in the field or in an office.

"We worked very closely with our customers on the development of the new F5 tablet, and among the requirements was best-in-class security. That's why we turned to Motion's longtime fingerprint sensor supplier AuthenTec to add convenient security to this innovative new tablet," said Jerome Kearns, Motion's SVP of Operations. "We believe that the AuthenTec fingerprint sensor helps simplify password management while increasing data security on highly mobile devices."

"We are pleased to further expand our longstanding relationship with Motion, and we look forward to supporting the successful launch of their new semi-rugged tablet PC," said Tom Aebli, AuthenTec's senior director of PC Marketing. "Our durable fingerprint sensor adds convenient security to the F5. Today's field service personnel will experience reliable and consistent operation when they're ready to put the F5 to work. That's because our TruePrint-based fingerprint sensor reads below the surface of the skin to quickly and easily image their worn, calloused or dirty fingerprints."

The Motion Computing F5 tablet uses AuthenTec's AES1610 fingerprint sensor. This small, secure, highly integrated sensor has been integrated into millions of laptop PCs and PC peripherals. The AES1610 is based on the company's patented TruePrint(R) technology, the only solution in volume production that reads below the surface of the skin to the live layer where a person's true fingerprint resides. This unique subsurface approach enables AuthenTec sensors to read virtually every fingerprint, every time.

About Motion Computing

Motion Computing is a mobile computing and wireless communications leader, combining world-class innovation and industry experience so professionals in vertical industries such as healthcare, field sales and service and government can use computing technology in new ways and places. The company's enhanced line of tablet PCs, mobile clinical assistants and accessories are designed to increase productivity for on-the-go users while providing portability, security, power and versatility. Motion combines those products with services and unique vertical market knowledge to deliver robust solutions - platforms, peripherals, services and wireless - customized for the needs of a particular industry. For more information, visit www.motioncomputing.com

About AuthenTec

With more than 25 million sensors sold worldwide, AuthenTec is the world leader in providing fingerprint authentication sensors and solutions to the high-volume PC, wireless device, and access control markets. AuthenTec's award-winning sensors take full advantage of The Power of Touch(R) by utilizing the company's patented TruePrint(R) technology to deliver the most convenient, reliable and cost-effective means available for enabling touch-powered features that extend beyond user authentication. The company's customers include: ASUSTeK, Fujitsu, HP, Hitachi, HTC, Lenovo, LG Electronics, Samsung, and Toshiba, among others.

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