NYC Building Inspectors Use Mobile App on Tablets

— March 15, 2011

Warshaw Group announced today that Mobile Validity, its mobile enterprise application system, will continue to be utilized by the New York City Department of Design and Construction (DDC) as the department expands the scope of its inspection project. The DDC is currently in the process of conducting building condition assessments on city-owned properties using Warshaw Group technology.

These inspections are a service that DDC provides to other city agencies. DDC conducts in-depth building condition assessments on city assets and provides data on needed repairs to the controlling agency. The program has been a benefit to the customer agencies, with several requesting that more of their buildings be included in the process.

"We've completed additional buildings for the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and we are starting up 42 new buildings for DEP," says John Weibel, director, building assessment at the DDC. "The system can be custom tailored to encompass different facilities and different departments."

DDC inspectors are provided with tablet PCs running a Mobile Validity-powered inspection application. Each inspector can conduct a thorough inspection on all facets of the city building, record the results electronically and upload them to the DDC in real-time. The end product is a quality digital inspection service that provides actionable data to the agencies, highlighting issues and trouble spots that may not otherwise have been discovered.

"We are excited to be working with the DDC on a new round of assessments for this project that originated in 2007," says Rob Burton, Warshaw Group project manager for the DDC. "We are proud to support the DDC in their efforts to help their client agencies better understand the condition of their facilities."

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