OneTok Allows Developers to Give Apps Voice Capabilities

By Gerard Longo, Assistant Editor — July 25, 2012

New York-based startup OneTok has launched a new, eponymous platform that will allow users to navigate their internet-capable smart devices without lifting a finger.

OneTok allows developers to voice-enable the applications they create. This, according to OneTok co-founder Ben Lilienthal, allows for fast, easy and convenient smart device navigation that will catch on quickly.

“People are going to use it because its cheaper, faster and better, then people will use it because it’s more convenient,” Lilienthal said. “My experience is that if you give someone an easier way to do something, they’ll take it.”

A Hands-Free Tool For the Enterprise

Lilienthal told Mobile Enterprise that the OneTok platform has enterprise benefits, as it will allow workers in environments that require heavy use of their hands or large amounts of driving to use their smart devices to communicate and find out important information while on the job.

“It’s a real efficiency tool for the enterprise,” Lilienthal said. “Where we’ve gotten the most interest in the market is with people who are running fleets of vehicles and don’t want their guys talking while they’re driving.”

Consumer Implications

If OneTok is successful in the enterprise, Lilienthal can certainly see a world where the regular consumers will begin widespread use of the platform and others like it.

“It’s going from the guy or girl who is stringing electrical wires to the couch potato,” Lilienthal said. “We’re looking to get to the IT guy first, and through them, reach the consumer.”

OneTok is available for developers immediately and is compatible with any major operating system including Android, iOS and BlackBerry 10.

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