Parts of Three States Get Wireless Broadband Service from Alltel Wireless

— December 06, 2006

Residents in north Louisiana, east Texas and southern Arkansas now have access to wireless broadband service from Alltel Wireless. The company's evolution data optimized technology connects users to the Internet nearly as fast as wired broadband links such as cable modem or DSL.

Using the service, customers can access advanced business and entertainment applications from their laptops, smartphones or handsets at average speeds of 400 to 700 Kbps with maximum speeds of up to 2.4 Mbps. Axcess Broadband makes it easy to surf the Internet, access email and calendars and download large, graphic-rich files while on the go.

“Alltel Wireless is committed to meeting the growing data needs of our customers,” said Joanna Miller, vice president of business solutions for Alltel Wireless in Louisiana. “Axcess Broadband Internet service delivers an unmatched wireless broadband experience that will keep both traveling business professionals and casual users connected with the fastest and most reliable data services.”

Alltel is rapidly expanding its high-speed network across the country. In the past year, Alltel has introduced Axcess Broadband in metropolitan areas such as Tampa, Charlotte, Cleveland and Phoenix; in smaller cities such as Little Rock, Ark., Raleigh, N.C., and Savannah, Ga., and in towns such as Jonesboro, Ark., Dothan, Ala., and Durango, Colo.

Alltel plans to launch Axcess Broadband in additional markets across the country, giving it one of the largest EVDO footprints of any U.S. carrier.

POST A COMMENT

comments powered by Disqus

RATE THIS CONTENT (5 Being the Best)

12345
Current rating: 0 (0 ratings)

MOST READ STORIES

topics

Must See


FEATURED REPORT

Who Owns Mobility

Less than one decade ago, smartphones and tablets changed workplace technology—virtually overnight. IT lost "control" and users became decision makers. Is it any wonder we are still trying to figure things out, and that the question of  "who owns mobility" remains? This research examines the current state of mobility in an attempt to answer that question.