Sony Says No More Recalls

— August 30, 2006

While Apple and Dell have each issued recalls on a combined 5.9 million laptop batteries, Sony Electronics says it has no plans to do the same with its own notebook computers.

Sony Electronics spokesperson Rick Clancy said the company hasn't experienced any significant issues with batteries in its Sony Vaio series or any other laptops it produces. All of them use Sony's own batteries. As of today, media reports have counted two incidents of heating and flaming Sony laptops, but neither had anything to do with faulty Sony batteries, said Clancy. He added one incident, in Kansas , was confirmed to involve a counterfeit battery.

“As far as Vaio PCs are concerned we don't anticipate any need for a recall at this time, and that's true from our understanding of other manufacturers we supply this technology to as well,” Clancy said.

Other companies haven't been so lucky. In a recall statement, the Consumer Products Safety Commission announced on August 24 that Apple had reported nine incidents of Sony-produced lithium-ion batteries overheating. Two of these cases led to minor burns and other various types of damage. The commission announced in a separate recall statement on August 15 that Dell had reported six overheating incidents, which resulted in property damage. Media reports showed some of the Dell damages were due to the laptops catching on fire. Both the Apple and Dell recalls were made in cooperation with the commission.

Typically, batteries that experience short circuits immediately power off, and flaming laptop incidents are rare, Clancy said.

So when it comes to Sony's own laptops, “there's no indication that there's an excessive number of situations that have occurred that would warrant this type of action,” he said.

Clancy also said Sony Electronics is speaking regularly with its battery customers and thinks the recalls will stop with Apple and Dell.

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