Tablets May Bridge the Mobile Gap

— July 07, 2014

Smartphone and laptop use is widespread among enterprises with nearly three out of every four organizations issuing corporate-owned laptops and smartphones to their workforces—whereas tablets are issued by only 47% of enterprises.

However, these devices are expected to bridge this gap over the next three years as many of the more data-intensive mobile apps migrate over to tablets, according to Frost and Sullivan's new analysis: The Future of Mobile Devices from a Customer Perspective—United States and Europe.

Managing BYOD
The research shows that by 2016, the use of smartphones is expected to decrease from the current levels of 66% to 58%—while tablets are expected to increase from 49% to 56%.

While almost 60% of organizations allow personal devices to be connected to the corporate network, only four out of 10 IT decision makers report that their company has a formal bring your own device (BYOD) policy in place.

"Approximately 58% of large enterprises have a formal BYOD policy, while only 20% of small businesses have a standardized policy," said Frost & Sullivan Research Analyst Karolina Olszewska. "The most common method of enforcing BYOD policies is through network technology solutions at 67%, followed by mobile device management (MDM) at 61%."

Remote Workstations
The enterprise mobile device landscape is rapidly changing, evidenced by the surprising emergence of Android as the most common (56%) mobile operating system supported for organization-owned devices—followed by iOS (41%), Windows Mobile (30%) and BlackBerry (28%).

While the banking, finance and insurance sector has been the most prominent user of smartphones for business purposes in 2013, in the tablet segment, manufacturing took top honours.

"Overall, 62% of the workforce is traditional, working at office locations. Mobile workers account for 22% and remote workers the remaining 16%," noted Olszewska. "Although this trend is not expected to change drastically within the next three years, the number of in-office workers is expected to decrease, while remote and mobile workers are expected to increase, signifying greater opportunities for smartphone and tablet makers."

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