AT&T Announces Two Windows 8 Tablets

— October 09, 2012

AT&T announced that is would be the only U.S. carrier for two new tablets from ASUS and Samsung that are designed for Windows 8 and aimed at giving customers the convenience of a tablet with the productivity of a PC.

The ASUS VivoTab RT tablet is thin, lightweight, and has extended battery life. The device features a 10.1-inch multi-touch Super IPS display with ASUS TruVivid technology, and is equipped with 32 GB of storage and NVIDIA’s quad-core Tegra 3 TE processor. The 4G LTE-capable tablet also offers productivity tools with Microsoft Office Home and Student 2013 RT Preview Edition.

Meanwhile, Samsung’s ATIV Smart PC offers customers PC capability in a tablet form factor. With a detachable keyboard docking system, users can switch between a clamshell notebook and a tablet PC. The device also allows users to work on the go with an 11.6-inch HD PLS display, an Intel Clover Trail 1.5 GHz dual core processor and 64 GB of internal storage memory. The device comes installed with Windows 8 and pre-loaded with a trial version of Microsoft Office 2013 for productivity apps, including Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

Customers purchasing the Windows 8 tablets from AT&T have access to the company’s “Mobile Share” plans. These plans permit new and existing customers to share a single bucket of data across smartphones, tablets, and other compatible devices, enabling them to build a plan to fit their devices and usage. Customers can select one of the shared data plans or choose an existing individual or family plan.

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