AT&T Spending $1B On Network; Dev Partners Too?

By  Evan Koblentz — April 09, 2010

April 9, 2010
 
AT&T is planning a $1 billion investment into its network and new partnerships with system integration technologies, while emphasizing the benefits for users of cloud services, enterprise mobility, and vertical applications.
 
On the enterprise front, AT&T is spotlighting existing WiFi and future LTE (4G) services which also include machine-to-machine applications and unspecified "integrated network solutions," according a company statement this week.
 
Officials last fall said designing a mobile enterprise application is complicated and business customers don't do enough homework before starting projects.
 
Now, "These solutions will simplify application delivery for enterprises by offering a scalable and robust fully managed solution, combined with professional services, hosting, and developer tools," said Cindy Zanelli, executive director, product marketing management, in a statement emailed to Mobilizing Biz Apps today.  She did not elaborate on how such offerings change or expand AT&T's current products and services.
 
Steve Hilton, of Analysis Mason, said he thinks AT&T will proceed by expanding their application development partnerships beyond the current trio of Antenna Software, Pyxis Mobile, and Spring Wireless.
 
Direct acquisitions are unlikely, however, "I think they are still on the market for other application platform companies. I think we're at the beginning," Hilton said.
 
In vertical markets, AT&T plans to bolster is focus on mobile healthcare and smart grid applications, officials said. Other verticals targeted in the investment are education, finance, government, manufacturing, and retail.

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