comScore's TabLens Tablet Analytics Service Hits the Market

— August 07, 2012

comScore, Inc. has announced the launch of comScore TabLens, its monthly syndicated service providing insights into U.S. tablet ownership and usage. Based on a 3-month rolling sample of 6,000 U.S. tablet owners, TabLens provides insight into tablet audiences, including demographics, content consumption habits and device ownership, to provide the industry with the most up-to-date look at this expanding tablet market.

comScore TabLens provides monthly syndicated reporting of tablet ownership and usage in the U.S. Product features include monthly reporting based on a 3-month rolling sample size of 6,000 U.S. tablet owners, including demographic insights including age, gender, household income, education and ethnicity. TabLens also provides insights into tablet ownership by device and operating system, as well as on-device media consumption.

iOS and Android Tablets Capturing Different Consumer Segments

Demographic analysis of tablet audiences by platform revealed distinct differences across three separate tablet audiences - iPad, Android and Kindle Fire. iPad owners skewed male (52.9 percent), slightly younger (44.5 percent under the age of 35) and wealthier (46.3 percent residing in households with income of $100k or greater) compared to an average tablet user during the three-month average period ending June 2012.

In comparison, Kindle Fire owners saw their audience skew female with 56.6 percent of its audience base represented by females. Both Android and Kindle Fire users saw household income below that of iPad owners, aligning more closely with household income reported by smartphone owners.

Apps, Price and Brand Most Important in Purchase Decision, Having Same OS as Phone Not as Important

Analysis of the top purchase consideration factors for an average tablet owner found that selection of apps and price of tablet led as the most important factors, both scoring 7.7 on a 10-point scale. Brand name of tablet and tablet operating system followed as the next most important factors each with a 7.5-rating, while music/video capabilities ranked #5 in purchase consideration factors with a rating of 7.4.

A comparative look at the purchase consideration factors for iPad and Kindle Fire owners found significant differences between what these consumers deemed important. iPad owners found selection of apps most important in their purchase decision, scoring an 8.1, closely followed by brand name of tablet with a rating of 8.0. Meanwhile, Kindle Fire owners placed the greatest weight on price of tablet (8.1), followed by selection of apps (7.5). Brand name of tablet and operating system were both scored as less important among Kindle Fire owners than among iPad owners.

Somewhat surprisingly, consumers did not place strong importance on having the same operating system across their tablet and smartphone, with this factor falling outside of the top five consideration factors for iPad, Kindle Fire and the average tablet owner. This finding highlights the potential for brands, such as Microsoft with its recently announced Surface Tablet, to see consumer adoption in the tablet market even though they might lack strong penetration in the smartphone market.

Tablet Satisfaction High Across the Board, Highest Among iPad Owners

Device satisfaction is an important measure in understanding sentiment post-purchase, especially with consumers having a growing number of tablet options available to them. New TabLens data showed that tablet owners were highly satisfied with their respective devices, with the average overall satisfaction rating reaching 8.6 on a 10-point scale. In comparison, smartphone owners rated overall satisfaction with their device an 8.1. iPad owners experienced the highest level of satisfaction (8.8 rating), followed closely by Kindle Fire owners (8.7). Android tablet users (excluding Kindle Fire) had a slightly lower satisfaction rating of 8.2, but which was still very strong in absolute terms.

POST A COMMENT

comments powered by Disqus

RATE THIS CONTENT (5 Being the Best)

12345
Current rating: 3.5 (2 ratings)

MOST READ STORIES

topics

Must See


FEATURED REPORT

Who Owns Mobility

Less than one decade ago, smartphones and tablets changed workplace technology—virtually overnight. IT lost "control" and users became decision makers. Is it any wonder we are still trying to figure things out, and that the question of  "who owns mobility" remains? This research examines the current state of mobility in an attempt to answer that question.