Datalogic Mobile Announces New System Platform: Power3

By PRESS RELEASE — April 06, 2010

Eugene, OR -- Datalogic Mobile announces the release of Power3 a new system platform for rugged mobile computers.
 
Power3 gives IT Managers, end-users, and solution developers the tools they need to maximize mobility benefits and efficiencies while minimizing implementation time and cost. Datalogic engineers and product managers traveled extensively interviewing users, IT managers, system integrators, software developers, and many others to titrate their needs into what is now Power3.
 
Moving forward all new Datalogic Mobile devices will be built upon the Power3 system platform. "We set out to do more than develop new mobile computer products, we wanted to elevate the platform on which the technology is based," comments Tom Burke Vice President of Product Marketing and Support. "Power3 the DNA of our products affecting how they are designed, manufactured, and implemented."
 
Power3 is:
  • C3 -- Capture, Compute, Communicate: Power3 means Datalogic Mobile computers Capture, Compute, and Communicate data, voice, and media transmissions real time without impacting system performance.
  • F3 -- Form, Feel, Function: Power3 assures end users the Form, Feel, and Function of a mobile computer built with an emphasis on ruggedness and the human interface. Power3 equipped computers will give years of service with ergonomics that minimize user fatigue and maximize user acceptance.
  • D3 -- Develop, Deploy, Direct: Power3 gives programmers and integrators the tools needed to Develop, Deploy, and Direct mobility solutions quickly and easily. Datalogic computers come out of the box with preloaded software and tools to speed the creation and management of mobility systems.

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