ESI Makes Unified Communications Play With Bluetooth Voice Integration Products

By PRESS RELEASE — August 11, 2008

ESI Bluetooth Voice Integration Products Begin Shipping

Fusion of Mobility and ESI Communications Servers Improves Productivity


PLANO, Texas--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Estech Systems, Inc. (ESI), a leader in digital and IP business communications systems, has announced the general availability of one of its innovative ESI Bluetooth Voice Integration products, which combine the mobility of Bluetooth technology and the power of an ESI Communications Server to improve business productivity.
"ESI Bluetooth Voice Integration products turn the common use of cell phones and Bluetooth headsets in the workplace into an advantage," said Doug Boyd, ESI's President and Chief Operating Officer. "The integration of commercially available Bluetooth devices with ESI Communications Servers gives our customers the flexibility they want and the productivity their businesses require."

ESI Cellular Management
ESI Cellular Management lets customers manage cellular phone calls along with normal business calls, all from an ESI 48-Key Feature Phone, while in the office. This access device allows inbound cellular calls to be managed by the ESI Communications Server just like any other regular office call, so they can access standard ESI features such as call forwarding, transferring, conferencing, call recording, department call coverage, and routing to voice mailboxes. Here are a few ways ESI Cellular Management simplifies business communications:
 
  • Provides an interface for Bluetooth-capable cell phones.
  • Lets a user easily make and take cell phone calls on an ESI 48-Key digital or IP Feature Phone.
  • Routes unanswered cell phone calls to either an ESI voice mailbox or the cell carrier's voice mail, whichever the user desires.
  • Allows sharing cell phone access, as if it were an extra phone line but without the extra expense.
"ESI Cellular Management eliminates the common interruptions most business cell phone users experience. Rather than the typical Ã.‚¬Ëœjuggling' between the desktop phone and the cell phone, ESI Cellular Management turns the cell phone into another part of the advanced ESI business communications system, and does so in a way no other system can match," said Boyd.

ESI Bluetooth Headset Interface
The ESI Bluetooth Headset Interface lets customers use any compatible Bluetooth headset with any headset-compatible ESI 48-Key Feature Phone. Once the adapter is installed on the ESI 48-Key Feature Phone and "paired" with a standard Bluetooth headset, the user can answer, originate, and terminate calls seamlessly using the headset or a programmed feature key. The ESI Bluetooth Headset Interface not only maintains all headset capabilities available on ESI Communications Servers but also frees users from traditional, costly wired headsets and handset lifters.

Availability
The digital version of the ESI Cellular Management Access Device is currently available through ESI's nationwide network of Certified Resellers. The IP version of the ESI Cellular Management Access Device, as well as the ESI Bluetooth Headset Interface, are scheduled for release in the third quarter of this year. Bluetooth headsets and compatible Bluetooth cellular phones must be purchased separately.
 
About ESI
ESI (Estech Systems, Inc.) designs and manufactures business communications systems and components. ESI's systems offer advanced technological design and ease of use, yet are very cost-competitive. The product line includes ESI Communications Servers, which support both digital and IP technologies in any desired combination. ESI's business communications systems are sold through hundreds of factory-trained Certified Resellers. Founded in 1987, ESI is a rapidly growing, privately held corporation with headquarters in Plano, Texas.

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