Janam Introduces Rugged Mobile Computer Featuring New Motorola Laser Engine

By Ariel Jones — January 17, 2012

Janam Technologies, a provider of rugged mobile computers that scan barcodes and communicate wirelessly, announced the release of its new XG105 rugged mobile computer. Janam is the first licensee to incorporate Motorola's new SE96X in its products, which delivers increased scan repetition rates.

The new device is designed for use in scan-intensive environments; barcodes can be scanned from up to 17 feet away, and its open-air range is up to 150 feet greater than earlier devices. In terms of durability, the XG105 meets high drop- and dust- protection standards. It features a 3.7-inch color VGA screen and a backlit key panel.

It also comes equipped with 256 MB mobile DDR memory and pre-installed Wavelink Avalanche and TE WLAN management tools. The device runs on the Windows Mobile 6.1 operating system and a Marvell XScale PXA320 624 MHz processor.

The XG105 is the latest addition to Janam's XG Series of rugged mobile computers, all of which feature Summit WiFi radio, Aruba Newtorks and Cisco certification, and Honeywell's Adaptus imaging technology.

"We are pleased to offer Motorola’s SE96X, best-in-class, miniature, high-performance scan engine in the XG Series product line," Harry B. Lerner, CEO of Janam, said in a statement. "For customers that need both close-range and distance barcode scanning as well as reliable capture of barcodes that are damaged or underneath shrinkwrap, the XG105 offers unrivaled performance, scanning range and durability."

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